CORONAVIRUS (COVID-19) RESOURCE CENTER Read More

Child Welfare

    Results: 11

  • Anger Management (8)
    RP-1400.8000-070

    Anger Management

    RP-1400.8000-070

    Programs that provide educational and/or therapeutic opportunities for people who are interested in or who need to learn how to deal with their anger in a positive, functional way. Participants may include people who internalize their anger as well as those who act it out verbally or in behavior toward friends, family, children, employers or other people in their lives. Included are court-ordered and voluntary programs for people who are involved in domestic violence or child abuse as well as general workshops for people who are uncomfortable with the way they express their anger.
  • Child Abuse Prevention (5)
    FN-1500.1900-150

    Child Abuse Prevention

    FN-1500.1900-150

    Programs, often offered in the schools or in other community settings, that attempt to protect children from physical, sexual and/or emotional abuse or exploitation through a variety of educational interventions which may focus on children of various ages, parents, people who work with children and/or the community at large. The sessions may offer suggestions for children and/or parents regarding ways of avoiding or handling an abusive or potentially abusive situation and/or information about the indicators and incidence of abuse, requirements for reporting abuse and community resources that are available to children who have been abused and to their families.
  • Child Welfare/Family Services Agencies and Associations (29)
    TN-1450

    Child Welfare/Family Services Agencies and Associations

    TN-1450

    Organizations whose members are agencies and individual professionals concerned with the welfare of children, youth and their families who have affiliated for the purpose of promoting mutual interests, participating in seminars and conferences, networking with their peers, subscribing to journals and other publications, and taking advantage of other opportunities for continuing professional development. Members may work in a particular field such as adoption, children's protective services, foster care or parenting; or may represent a broad range of systems that serve children, youth and their families. Many child welfare/family services associations set standards which relate to the qualifications and performance of members; offer certification programs; maintain a job bank; provide a forum for the exchange of ideas and information; promote high quality services through publications, training, consultation and other forms of support which strengthen member agencies and their staffs; and support a public policy agenda that promotes the well-being of the population they serve.
  • Children’s Rights (17)
    TD-1600.3100-140

    Children’s Rights

    TD-1600.3100-140

    Organizations that support the passage and enforcement of laws that protect children from arbitrary treatment, abuse, neglect, exploitation and other forms of maltreatment; and which promote social measures that are designed to enhance the well-being of children.
  • Children's Protective Services (2)
    PH-6500.1500

    Children's Protective Services

    PH-6500.1500

    Programs that investigate reports of child abuse, neglect or abandonment; document substantiated cases; provide for the temporary placement of children who, for their own protection, have been removed from the custody of the adults who are responsible for their care; work with families who are experiencing a problem with child abuse with the objective of facilitating continued family unification or reunification; and provide ongoing supportive services for children in permanent placement.
  • Family Group Conferencing (14)
    PH-2360.2300

    Family Group Conferencing

    PH-2360.2300

    Programs that work with families involved with the child welfare system using a process that brings together the strengths of families outside the courtroom setting to find solutions for children who have come into foster care or are at risk for placement outside the home due to abuse or neglect. If successful, children can safely remain with or return to a family member or, possibly, their parents, rather than be placed for adoption or have some other permanent goal established for them. Typically a case worker meets with immediate family members to identify the larger family unit to participate in the process, and a neutral coordinator works with the family as they discuss issues and options. Then the family works privately to develop a plan of action. People involved in the process may include parents, grandparents, other kin, children, tribal elders (where relevant) and individuals whom the family considers to be supportive (e.g., neighbors, clergy). In most instances, families participate in family group conferencing on a voluntary basis, though in a few locations, meetings are court-ordered. In some areas, the practice is also being used in juvenile justice and TANF cases.
  • Family Support Centers/Outreach (10)
    PH-2360.2400

    Family Support Centers/Outreach

    PH-2360.2400

    Programs that provide a wide variety of social services that are designed to support the healthy development of families, improve family interaction skills and help fragile families to resolve their problems at a pre-crisis stage before they become unmanageable. Services may be center-based or provided on an outreach basis to families who are initially reluctant to seek support and generally target the specific needs of a particular community. Included may be self-sufficiency programs which help families break the cycle of poverty by addressing the barriers to self-sufficiency; early child development and school success programs; programs which address the needs of teen parents; programs which target parents at risk for becoming abusive; programs for families with children who have special developmental needs and programs that focus on the maternal and child health care needs of first-time, expectant women whose babies are at high risk for low birth weight and infant mortality.
  • Foster Home Placement (5)
    PH-2400.1900

    Foster Home Placement

    PH-2400.1900

    Programs that link individuals who are in need of alternative living arrangements with appropriate private family homes that are licensed to provide foster care. Licensing requirements vary from state to state and, in some situations, licensing is not required at all. Programs that provide placement services for children and adults with disabilities are generally also responsible for recruiting, training, certifying and monitoring placements in family homes and for providing support for the family and the individual(s) with disabilities who live with them.
  • Latchkey/Home Alone Safety Programs (4)
    JR-8200.6500-450

    Latchkey/Home Alone Safety Programs

    JR-8200.6500-450

    Programs that are designed to increase public awareness of the measures that people can take to ensure the safety of children who have to stay unsupervised in their homes after school or throughout the day because their parent(s) are working or otherwise engaged and child care is unavailable. Topics may include applicable Child Welfare laws, assessing a child's readiness to assume responsibility for self-care, caring for younger siblings, preparing the home for a child who will be left alone (e.g., deadbolt locks on doors; first aid kits, fire extinguishers and smoke detectors in place; adult beverages and firearms secured), safety precautions (e.g., answering the door or telephone, emergency phone numbers, using appliances such as a gas stove, calling 911), practicing emergency procedures (what to do in case of a fire, earthquake or threatening weather), key security, house rules, watching TV or using the Internet and the importance of good parent-child communication about the issue.
  • Parenting Education (21)
    PH-6100

    Parenting Education

    PH-6100

    Programs that provide classes, workshops or other educational opportunities for parents or potential parents who want to acquire the knowledge and skills to be effective in their parenting role.
  • Youth Aging Out of Foster Care (2)
    YO-1550.1500

    Youth Aging Out of Foster Care

    YO-1550.1500

    Individuals who work in organizations that are concerned with adoption, children's protective services, foster care, parenting support and other services that ensure the welfare of children and their families. They may investigate home conditions to protect children from harmful environments; evaluate foster and home environmental factors and the personal characteristics of potential adoptive or foster parents to determine their suitability for that role; place and take responsibility for children and their well-being in foster or adoptive homes, institutions and medical treatment centers; counsel children and parents, guardians, foster parents or institution staff concerning a child's adjustment to the foster home situation; and/or counsel adoptive parents pending legal adoption. They may also aid parents with child rearing problems, counsel children and youth who have difficulty adjusting socially; advise parents on how to care for children with disabilities, arrange for homemaker services during a parent's illness and provide service to unmarried parents including care during pregnancy and planning for the child. If children have serious problems in school, child welfare workers may consult with parents, teachers and counselors to identify underlying causes and develop plans for treatment.