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Food

    Results: 13

  • Brown Bag Food Programs (7)
    BD-1800.1000

    Brown Bag Food Programs

    BD-1800.1000

    Programs offered by senior centers or other community organizations, generally outside the food pantry network, that pack shopping bags (or other containers) with a supply of nutritional donated and surplus food for distribution to low-income individuals or families, students or older adults to supplement their meals at home.
  • Community Gardening (35)
    BD-2600.1500

    Community Gardening

    BD-2600.1500

    Programs that provide plots of land on which groups of people living in a neighborhood can grow fruits, vegetables, herbs and flowers. Community gardens provide access to fresh produce and plants; may be located in parks, schools, hospital grounds or other open areas; and may be nurtured communally and the bounty shared, have individual plots for personal use, or be dedicated to "urban agriculture" where produce is grown for a market. Some have raised beds that are accessible to people with disabilities. The gardens provide an opportunity for participants to savor the freshness, flavor and wholesomeness of home-grown produce; save money on their food bills; grow traditional foods not available in the supermarket; or simply get some exercise and enjoy the benefits of being outdoors. They also support a community's food security, contribute to the preservation of open space, strengthen community bonds, provide a sense of connection to the environment and offer opportunities for community education.
  • Congregate Meals/Nutrition Sites (13)
    BD-5000.1500

    Congregate Meals/Nutrition Sites

    BD-5000.1500

    Programs that provide hot meals on a regular basis primarily for older adults who may be at risk for nutritional deficits and social isolation without assistance. Congregate meals are often combined with recreational, educational and social activities, and programs may include access to health services and/or information. Some programs are also open to caregivers, spouses and/or adults with disabilities.
  • Emergency Food (7)
    BD-1800

    Emergency Food

    BD-1800

    Programs that provide a limited amount of food for individuals or families during times of personal crisis, or for people who have no food or cannot afford to purchase food at retail costs.
  • Farmers Markets (15)
    BD-2400.2250

    Farmers Markets

    BD-2400.2250

    Programs that enable farmers to gather in empty parking areas or similar spaces and sell freshly picked produce directly to consumers at lower than retail but higher than wholesale prices.
  • Food Banks/Food Distribution Warehouses (2)
    BD-1875.2000

    Food Banks/Food Distribution Warehouses

    BD-1875.2000

    Programs that gather, sort, store and distribute to participating charitable agencies, surplus food products and edible but unmarketable food that has been acquired from growers, grocers and other sources. Also included are the supermarket chains, food manufacturers, wholesalers, restaurant suppliers, agencies that organize food drives, government departments (e.g., the USDA) and other organizations that donate food on a regular basis to food banks and/or directly to food pantries, meal programs, homeless shelters and other human service agencies with food programs.
  • Food Gleaning Programs (2)
    BD-1875.2200

    Food Gleaning Programs

    BD-1875.2200

    Programs that obtain unharvested fruits and vegetables for use by food banks, brown bag programs and other charitable food distribution programs from farmers who have crops left over following professional harvesting (or whose fields are not profitable to reap), local gardeners, and others who have fresh crops they are unable to use. Depending on local arrangements, eligible individuals and families may be invited along with volunteers to participate in organized picking trips and obtain food for their own table at no cost.
  • Food Pantries (67)
    BD-1800.2000

    Food Pantries

    BD-1800.2000

    Programs that acquire food products through donations, canned food drives, food bank programs or direct purchase and distribute the food to people who are in emergency situations. Some pantries deliver food to people whose disabilities or illnesses make it difficult for them to leave home.
  • Food Stamps/SNAP (1)
    NL-6000.2000

    Food Stamps/SNAP

    NL-6000.2000

    A federally-funded program administered locally by the county or the state that enables low-income and indigent households to obtain an electronic benefit transfer (EBT) card similar to a bank debit card which can be used in most grocery stores to purchase food. Approved households are entitled to purchase a designated amount of food utilizing their cards based on net income and household size. Benefits are generally available in an EBT account within 30 days from the date an application was filed. Expedited food stamps are available within seven days for people who are in an emergency situation and whose income and spendable resources for that month are within specified limits.
  • Home Delivered Meals (3)
    BD-5000.3500

    Home Delivered Meals

    BD-5000.3500

    Programs that prepare and regularly deliver meals to older adults, people with disabilities and others who have difficulties shopping and/or preparing food for themselves or traveling to a site where a meal is being served.
  • Homeless Drop In Centers (7)
    BH-1800.3500

    Homeless Drop In Centers

    BH-1800.3500

    Centers where homeless people can spend time during the day or evening. Services may include counseling and/or medication monitoring on a formal or informal basis; personal hygiene supplies; facilities for showering, shaving, napping, laundering clothes, making necessary telephone calls or attending to other personal needs; and other basic supportive services. Some centers may also provide meals or facilities for cooking. Programs that focus on homeless youth may provide case management, living skills training, family reunification assistance, classes and other educational supports, pre-employment training, health education (including HIV prevention), help in obtaining valid ID and other services that help youth successfully exit street life and transition to independent living.
  • Pet Food (1)
    PD-6250.6600

    Pet Food

    PD-6250.6600

    Programs that supply dried or canned dog or cat food, bird seed, fodder or other types of sustenance for animals and other creatures that people keep as pets. Also included are programs that provide financial assistance that enables owners to purchase food for their pets.
  • WIC (1)
    NL-6000.9500

    WIC

    NL-6000.9500

    A public health nutrition program administered by the USDA Food and Nutrition Service that provides nutrition education, nutritious foods, breastfeeding support and health care referrals for income-eligible pregnant or postpartum women, infants and children up to age five. Foster parents, grandparents, guardians and single fathers who have custody of their children may also be eligible to receive food assistance for children up to age five if they meet income guidelines. WIC provides specific foods to supplement the dietary needs of participants to ensure good health and development. Food packages typically include iron-fortified infant cereal, milk, cheese, eggs, whole grains, peanut butter, beans, fruits, vegetables and juice. Families can shop for WIC foods at most grocery stores using a WIC electronic transfer benefit (EBT) card or vouchers.