Early Childhood Services (ages 0-5)

    Results: 9

  • Child Care Centers (87)
    PH-1250.1400

    Child Care Centers

    PH-1250.1400

    Programs that are licensed to provide supervised care within designated facilities for children during some portion of a 24-hour day. Staff for approved day care centers must meet defined educational requirements; the program must ensure specified adult/child ratios; and the facility must meet building, fire and zoning codes. Services may include recreational and developmental activities and snacks and/or meals, as appropriate.
  • Child Care Instruction (3)
    JR-8200.1500

    Child Care Instruction

    JR-8200.1500

    Programs that provide training for individuals who want to become qualified as occasional baby sitters or child care professionals, and who need information regarding rules, regulations, accepted practices and available resources.
  • Child Care Provider Referrals (3)
    PH-2400.1500

    Child Care Provider Referrals

    PH-2400.1500

    Programs that provide statewide and community-based services that are designed to improve the availability and quality of child care. These programs maintain lists of child care resources and link families who are in need of child care services with child care centers, licensed family child care homes and other organization-based providers; provide information that helps families become good consumers of child care services; recruit new child care providers to expand the availability of the service locally; provide training and technical assistance for providers; and collect and disseminate data which document the demand for child care services and the current availability of child care resources. Some programs may also make referrals to preschools and many provide referrals to children's play groups.
  • Developmental Assessment (107)
    LF-7000.1700

    Developmental Assessment

    LF-7000.1700

    Programs that provide a comprehensive, structured evaluation of a child’s cognitive/intellectual functioning, language and communication skills, independent living skills, social and emotional development and perceptual/motor functioning in order to identify individuals who show developmental delays, determine the nature and extent of the problem and recommend a course of treatment and care. Developmental assessments are generally offered by a developmental assessment specialist, or a team of professionals that can include a pediatrician, language specialist, audiologist, occupational therapist, child psychologist and child psychiatrist, among others. They involve age-adjusted questions regarding a child's growth, physical movements, behavior, play, and interactions with family members and the rest of the world as well as a series of tests that may include a physical exam, hearing and eye screenings, play observation, and standardized tests that present the child with specific tasks to determine areas of strength and weakness. Developmental assessments are occasionally done for adults. They can also be used to identify individuals who have developmental disabilities such as intellectual disabilities, epilepsy, cerebral palsy, autism and neurological impairments, in order to establish eligibility for state and federally funded programs.
  • Early Childhood Education (11)
    HD-1800

    Early Childhood Education

    HD-1800

    Programs that provide educational activities and experiences for children from birth to age five which are intended to foster social, physical, emotional and intellectual growth and prepare them for further formal learning.
  • Early Intervention for Children With Disabilities/Delays (21)
    LR-1700

    Early Intervention for Children With Disabilities/Delays

    LR-1700

    Programs that identify infants, toddlers and in some cases, preschoolers who show evidence of or are at risk for lags in physical development, cognitive development, language and speech development, psychosocial development or self-help skills, and provide or coordinate the delivery of an enrichment program in order to minimize the potential for a developmental delay and to meet their current developmental needs. The program may include early identification activities (child find); a developmental evaluation; a review of family concerns, priorities and resources; meetings with the family to develop an individualized family service plan; service coordination to ensure that the individual and his or her family receive needed services which may include but are not limited to physical therapy, occupational therapy, audiology, health/medical services, nursing services, nutrition services, psychological services including specialized play groups or therapy sessions, counseling, speech and language assistance, special instructional services, transportation, and parenting skills development; and ongoing evaluation of the child's progress and his or her changing enrichment needs. Included are "birth to three" programs and federal, state or local programs that address the needs of slightly older children or children not otherwise eligible for "birth to three" programs.
  • Parenting Skills Classes (10)
    PH-6100.6800

    Parenting Skills Classes

    PH-6100.6800

    Programs that teach skills that enable parents to deal constructively and consistently with a broad spectrum of child rearing problems which may include sibling rivalry; school behavior and performance; poor self-esteem; shyness; drug use; sexual promiscuity; and the whole range of negative, acting-out behaviors including whining, temper tantrums, disobedience, insolence and destructiveness. Some parenting skills development programs utilize a step-by-step approach for managing specific problems and may incorporate application at home of techniques that were discussed and practiced in the classroom setting. Other programs may offer participatory family workshops which provide opportunities for parents and children to learn and practice methods for dealing with one another under the guidance of a trained facilitator. Most training programs teach the parent a particular way of talking and relating to their children that reinforces positive behaviors and communication and decreases negative behaviors while supporting the development of a relationship that is built on fairness, mutual caring and respect.
  • Pediatric Occupational Therapy (8)
    LR-6200.6500

    Pediatric Occupational Therapy

    LR-6200.6500

    Programs that evaluate the skills of children who are having difficulty with the practical and social skills necessary for everyday life and provide therapy whose objective is to help them become as physically, psychologically and socially independent as possible. Occupational therapy is provided for children when there is a disruption in one or more of the following areas: gross motor skills, fine motor skills, cognitive-perceptual skills, sensory motor integration, visual motor skills, motor planning skills, play skills, socio-emotional skills and/or activities of daily living (self-care skills such as dressing, eating and personal hygiene). Included are programs for children with birth injuries, learning disabilities, cerebral palsy, developmental delays, intellectual disabilities, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism and a wide range of other conditions.
  • Pediatrics (76)
    LV-6800

    Pediatrics

    LV-6800

    Programs that are staffed by specialists who are concerned with the physical, emotional and social health of infants, children and adolescents from birth to young adulthood. Pediatricians have advanced training in the biological, social and environmental factors that have an influence on a developing child and have expertise in diagnosing and treating the acute and chronic diseases that are common to individuals in this age range.
 
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