Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities

    Results: 24

  • Adult Residential Care Homes (10)
    BH-8400.6000-040

    Adult Residential Care Homes

    BH-8400.6000-040

    Residential homes or facilities that offer personal care and individual attention for older adults, people with disabilities and other populations whose limitations prevent them from living alone. Adult residential care homes (which are also known as board and care homes, residential board and care homes, personal care homes or residential care facilities for the elderly) generally provide a room (which may be shared), meals and supervision; and may specialize in populations with specific needs such as people with Alzheimer's disease or those with developmental disabilities. Services vary from facility to facility but may include dietary and housekeeping services, monitoring of prescription medication, social and recreational opportunities, incontinence care and assistance with toileting, bathing, grooming, dressing, mobility and other activities of daily living. Some homes provide secured surroundings for confused elderly adults who may wander while others are unable to accept individuals who are incontinent or who have severe problems with memory loss. There is considerable variation among these homes in terms of size, resident mix, daily charges and services. Most but not all adult residential care homes or facilities are licensed by the state in which they are located.
  • Assistive Technology Issues (36)
    YZ-0600

    Assistive Technology Issues

    YZ-0600

    Programs that provide information and/or services that deal with the topic of assistive technology.
  • Braille Materials/Collections (2)
    TJ-4500.8300-100

    Braille Materials/Collections

    TJ-4500.8300-100

    Libraries or other organizations that maintain collections of books, magazines and other reading materials in Braille, a system that uses raised dots to represent numerals and letters of the alphabet which can be identified by the fingers, that are made available on a loan basis to community residents who are blind or who have visual impairments. Also included are organizations that distribute copies of books, magazines and other reading material in Braille format that people can keep.
  • Companion Dogs (3)
    LR-7950.1500-150

    Companion Dogs

    LR-7950.1500-150

    Programs that provide and train recipients in the use of dogs who have been taught to pick up dropped items, carry backpacks for books and other valuables, push elevator buttons, pull wheelchairs up hills or over curbs and provide other types of personal assistance including companionship and protection for people who have physical disabilities.
  • Developmental Assessment (107)
    LF-7000.1700

    Developmental Assessment

    LF-7000.1700

    Programs that provide a comprehensive, structured evaluation of a child’s cognitive/intellectual functioning, language and communication skills, independent living skills, social and emotional development and perceptual/motor functioning in order to identify individuals who show developmental delays, determine the nature and extent of the problem and recommend a course of treatment and care. Developmental assessments are generally offered by a developmental assessment specialist, or a team of professionals that can include a pediatrician, language specialist, audiologist, occupational therapist, child psychologist and child psychiatrist, among others. They involve age-adjusted questions regarding a child's growth, physical movements, behavior, play, and interactions with family members and the rest of the world as well as a series of tests that may include a physical exam, hearing and eye screenings, play observation, and standardized tests that present the child with specific tasks to determine areas of strength and weakness. Developmental assessments are occasionally done for adults. They can also be used to identify individuals who have developmental disabilities such as intellectual disabilities, epilepsy, cerebral palsy, autism and neurological impairments, in order to establish eligibility for state and federally funded programs.
  • Developmental Disabilities Social/Recreational Programs (30)
    LR-3100.1800-190

    Developmental Disabilities Social/Recreational Programs

    LR-3100.1800-190

    Community-based day programs that provide training in community integration and self-advocacy specifically as they relate to recreation and leisure pursuits. Participants are generally adults age 18-22 with developmental disabilities who are still in school and desire an after-school program or are older than age 22 but are not working or are working part-time.
  • Disabilities Issues (28)
    YZ-1700

    Disabilities Issues

    YZ-1700

    Programs that provide information and/or services that deal with the topic of disabilities.
  • Disability Associations (14)
    TN-1700

    Disability Associations

    TN-1700

    Organizations whose members are individuals who work in the disability field and have affiliated for the purpose of promoting mutual interests, participating in education and training conferences, interacting with other professionals and taking advantage of other opportunities for personal and professional development. Many disability associations also include individuals with disabilities and their families in their membership. Disability associations may also advocate for the rights of people with disabilities and their caregivers; promote legislation that funds research and services for this population; and provide information for members and the general public. Included are associations that focus on a specific disability such as autism or brain injuries; and those that address a broad range of disability issues.
  • Disability Awareness Programs (7)
    PH-6200.1850

    Disability Awareness Programs

    PH-6200.1850

    Programs that offer workshops, discussion groups, activities and other types of training that sensitize participants to people with disabilities, help them experience what it is like to have a disability, and share techniques for positive communication and interaction with people who have disabilities.
  • Disability Related Transportation (4)
    BT-4500.6500-170

    Disability Related Transportation

    BT-4500.6500-170

    Programs that provide door-to-door (or curb-to-curb) transportation for purposes of shopping, banking, social events, medical appointments, getting to and from work, and similar activities for people with disabilities who need special accommodations and are unable to utilize other available means of transportation. Also included are programs that provide transportation for youngsters with disabilities who have no other means of accessing necessary specialized services and activities.
  • Disease/Disability Information (1)
    LH-2700.1700

    Disease/Disability Information

    LH-2700.1700

    Programs that provide information about the etiology, symptoms, preventive measures, screening/diagnostic procedures, and/or methods of treatment or management for specific illnesses or disabling conditions; and/or which disseminate information about the latest research with regard to a particular illness or condition. Included are programs that maintain disease registries, i.e., databases that contain information about people who have been diagnosed with a specific type of disease and have been treated by a particular hospital or live within a particular geographic area. Registry information is used by public health authorities to identify and investigate unusual patterns of occurrence of the disease and can help communities plan for and deliver needed medical services.
  • Early Intervention for Children With Disabilities/Delays (21)
    LR-1700

    Early Intervention for Children With Disabilities/Delays

    LR-1700

    Programs that identify infants, toddlers and in some cases, preschoolers who show evidence of or are at risk for lags in physical development, cognitive development, language and speech development, psychosocial development or self-help skills, and provide or coordinate the delivery of an enrichment program in order to minimize the potential for a developmental delay and to meet their current developmental needs. The program may include early identification activities (child find); a developmental evaluation; a review of family concerns, priorities and resources; meetings with the family to develop an individualized family service plan; service coordination to ensure that the individual and his or her family receive needed services which may include but are not limited to physical therapy, occupational therapy, audiology, health/medical services, nursing services, nutrition services, psychological services including specialized play groups or therapy sessions, counseling, speech and language assistance, special instructional services, transportation, and parenting skills development; and ongoing evaluation of the child's progress and his or her changing enrichment needs. Included are "birth to three" programs and federal, state or local programs that address the needs of slightly older children or children not otherwise eligible for "birth to three" programs.
  • Foster Homes for Children With Disabilities (1)
    PH-6300.1900

    Foster Homes for Children With Disabilities

    PH-6300.1900

    Agency-supervised private family homes that provide alternative family living arrangements for children with developmental disabilities, sensory impairments, physical disabilities or multiple disabilities who are unable to live with their birth parents. The arrangement provides an opportunity for the child with a disability to live with a family in a residential setting.
  • Home/Community Based Developmental Disabilities Programs (227)
    LR-3100

    Home/Community Based Developmental Disabilities Programs

    LR-3100

    Programs for individuals with developmental disabilities that focus on enabling the individual to attain his or her maximum functional level and which may serve to reinforce skills or lessons taught in school, therapy or other settings. Services may be provided in the individual's home or outside the home in community-based settings.
  • Occupational Therapy (6)
    LR-6200

    Occupational Therapy

    LR-6200

    Programs that evaluate the task performance skills of individuals who may be having difficulty engaging in self-care, work, play or leisure time activities and help people across the lifespan participate in the things they want and need to do through the therapeutic use of everyday activities (occupations). Occupational therapy services typically include an individualized evaluation, during which the individual/family and occupational therapist agree on the person's goals; customized intervention to improve the person's ability to perform daily activities and reach their goals; and an outcomes evaluation to ensure that the goals are being met. Common occupational therapy interventions include helping children with disabilities to participate fully in school and social situations, helping people recovering from injury to regain skills, and providing supports for older adults experiencing physical and cognitive changes.
  • Pediatric Occupational Therapy (8)
    LR-6200.6500

    Pediatric Occupational Therapy

    LR-6200.6500

    Programs that evaluate the skills of children who are having difficulty with the practical and social skills necessary for everyday life and provide therapy whose objective is to help them become as physically, psychologically and socially independent as possible. Occupational therapy is provided for children when there is a disruption in one or more of the following areas: gross motor skills, fine motor skills, cognitive-perceptual skills, sensory motor integration, visual motor skills, motor planning skills, play skills, socio-emotional skills and/or activities of daily living (self-care skills such as dressing, eating and personal hygiene). Included are programs for children with birth injuries, learning disabilities, cerebral palsy, developmental delays, intellectual disabilities, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism and a wide range of other conditions.
  • Physical Disabilities (7)
    YF-6500

    Physical Disabilities

    YF-6500

    Any of a variety of conditions that may be due to muscular, skeletal or neuromuscular disorders, paralysis or absence of one or more limbs, which impose physical limitations on the individual.
  • Protection and Advocacy for Individuals With Disabilities (11)
    FT-1000.6600

    Protection and Advocacy for Individuals With Disabilities

    FT-1000.6600

    Programs that provide assistance for individuals with disabilities who are having difficulty understanding and/or obtaining the full benefits and services to which they are entitled by law. Included are federally mandated programs that are part of the formal protection and advocacy system which includes Protection and Advocacy for Persons with Developmental Disabilities (PADD), Protection and Advocacy for Individuals with Mental Illness (PAIMI), Protection and Advocacy for Individual Rights (PAIR) and the Client Assistance Program (CAP); and independent organizations that provide the same types of services. Protection and advocacy programs provide legal representation and other advocacy services, under federal and state laws, for all people with disabilities and endeavor to ensure full access to inclusive educational programs, financial entitlements, health care, accessible housing and productive employment opportunities. The programs maintain a presence in facilities that care for people with disabilities where they monitor, investigate and attempt to remedy adverse conditions. CAP agencies (many of which are housed within protection and advocacy offices) provide information and assistance for individuals seeking or receiving vocational rehabilitation services under the Rehabilitation Act, including assistance in pursuing administrative, legal and other appropriate remedies.
  • Recreational Aids (7)
    LH-0600.7000

    Recreational Aids

    LH-0600.7000

    Programs that pay for or provide equipment or other products which have been modified to enhance the manner in which people with disabilities can take part in the leisure time pursuits of their choice. Included are modified dog leashes, craft making items, sewing accessories, games, puzzles, cards, video equipment, sports equipment, cycling equipment, toys and other similar products.
  • Special Education (12)
    HH-8000

    Special Education

    HH-8000

    Programs that provide educational services including special placement and individualized programming, instruction and/or support services for exceptional children, youth and/or adults, including those who have hearing impairments, visual impairments, physical disabilities, learning disabilities, intellectual disabilities and/or other developmental disabilities, emotional disturbance, multiple disabilities or speech or language impairments and who need appropriately modified curricula, teaching methodologies and instructional materials in order to learn. Services may include the development, in partnership with the child's parents, of an individualized educational plan to meet the child's needs and the implementation and review at least annually of each child's plan to determine progress and future needs.
  • Speech and Hearing (15)
    LR-8000

    Speech and Hearing

    LR-8000

    Programs that provide comprehensive diagnostic and treatment services for individuals who have speech and/or language problems, neurological disorders or diseases or disorders of the middle, inner and outer ear; larynx; tongue; mouth; or other structures whose coordination and appropriate functioning are necessary for speech and/or hearing.
  • Speech and Language Pathology (7)
    LR-8000.8000

    Speech and Language Pathology

    LR-8000.8000

    Programs that provide comprehensive diagnostic and treatment services for individuals who have language disorders or speech impairments including people who have neurological disorders; articulation, fluency or voice disorders; delayed language; cleft palate; tongue thrust problems; stuttering; or aphasia.
  • Supported Employment (98)
    ND-6500.8120

    Supported Employment

    ND-6500.8120

    Programs that find paid, meaningful work in a variety of community-based settings for people who have disabilities and which assign a "job coach" to work side-by-side with each client to interface with the employer and other employees, and provide training in basic job skills and work-related behaviors, assistance with specific tasks as needed and whatever other initial or ongoing support is required to ensure that the individual retains competitive employment. Included are individual placement models in which a job coach works on-the-job with a single individual and group models such as enclaves (which are self-contained work units of people needing support) and mobile work crews, in which a group of workers with disabilities receives continuous support and supervision from supported employment personnel. In the enclave model, groups of people with disabilities are trained to work as a team alongside employees in the host business supported by a specially trained on-site supervisor, who may work either for the host company or the placement agency. A variation of the enclave approach is called the "dispersed enclave" and is used in service industries (e.g., restaurants and hotels). Each person works on a separate job, and the group is dispersed throughout the company. In the mobile work crew model, a small team of people with disabilities works as a self-contained business and undertakes contract work such as landscaping and gardening projects. The crew works at various locations in a variety of settings within the community under the supervision of a job coach.
  • Supported Living Services for Adults With Disabilities (7)
    BH-8400.6000-840

    Supported Living Services for Adults With Disabilities

    BH-8400.6000-840

    Programs for adults with developmental disabilities, sensory impairments, physical disabilities, emotional problems or multiple disabilities who do not require 24-hour supervision that provide a highly individualized, coordinated system of services and supports which facilitates their ability to live in their own homes or apartments, to hire and supervise paid caregivers, to work in the community, to participate in community activities and to interact with nondisabled neighbors. A supported living agency may help the individual hire and supervise an attendant; develop a budget and pay bills on time; learn to shop and cook or hire someone to prepare meals for them; remember to take necessary medication; schedule medical appointments and get to the doctor's office; advertise for and select a roommate; make their living space barrier-free; learn about relationships, sexuality and parenting; select recreational pursuits that are personally satisfying; and accomplish other similar activities of daily living.
 
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